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Aberdare woman takes on 1 Million Step Challenge for Diabetes UK Cymru

A woman from Aberdare is taking on the 1 Million Step Challenge for Diabetes UK Cymru to support her partner, who has Type 1 diabetes.

 

Rachel Sullivan’s partner, Darren Williams, 37, was diagnosed with the condition aged 22.

 

The Challenge takes place between 1 July and 30 September and invites people to push themselves out of their comfort zone by taking one million steps over three months and get sponsored for every stride. 
 

It will take Rachel at least 10,000 steps a day to reach her million and she is already training hard.

 

Rachel, 37, said: “I’m doing the challenge with my friend Rhiannon Lewis and we have both started training already. I work in a care home and often reach more than 10,000 steps a day already! I’m planning to go for walks in the park on my days off to make sure I hit the total.

 

“Darren finds life with Type 1 diabetes challenging sometimes. I’m really looking forward to the challenge and knowing I’m supporting other people like him.”

 

Joseph Cuff, Fundraising Manager, Diabetes UK Cymru, said: “People can walk it, jog it or dance it! There is so much choice about how people can achieve one million steps. We’re really grateful to Rachel and Rhiannon for joining #TeamDUK to help raise vital funds to help people living with diabetes.

 

“Every penny raised will help us to support the millions of people living with diabetes in the UK so please give generously to back Rachel and support her efforts.

 

“You can take on the challenge alone, or like Rachel, get your family, friends and colleagues involved. You can even split the million steps between a team to make it easier.”

 

To find out more about the 1 Million Steps Challenge visit https://www.diabetes.org.uk/million-step.

 

To sponsor Rachel and Rhiannon, visit www.justgiving.com/fundraising/rhiannon-lewis12.

 

 

About Diabetes UK:

 

  1. Diabetes UK’s aim is creating a world where diabetes can do no harm. Diabetes is the most devastating and fastest growing health crisis of our time, affecting more people than any other serious health condition in the UK - more than dementia and cancer combined. There is currently no known cure for any type of diabetes. With the right treatment, knowledge and support people living with diabetes can lead a long, full and healthy life. For more information about diabetes and the charity’s work, visit www.diabetes.org.uk  

 

  1. Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose in the blood because the body cannot use it properly. If not managed well, both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can lead to devastating complications. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK and is a major cause of lower limb amputation, kidney failure and stroke. 

 

  1. People with Type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin. About 10 per cent of people with diabetes have Type 1. No one knows exactly what causes it, but it’s not to do with being overweight and it isn’t currently preventable. It’s the most common type of diabetes in children and young adults, starting suddenly and getting worse quickly. Type 1 diabetes is treated by daily insulin doses – taken either by injections or via an insulin pump. It is also recommended to follow a healthy diet and take regular physical activity.

 

  1. People with Type 2 diabetes don’t produce enough insulin or the insulin they produce doesn’t work properly (known as insulin resistance). Around 90 per cent of people with diabetes have Type 2. They might get Type 2 diabetes because of their family history, age and ethnic background puts them at increased risk. They are also more likely to get Type 2 diabetes if they are overweight. It starts gradually, usually later in life, and it can be years before they realise they have it. Type 2 diabetes is treated with a healthy diet and increased physical activity. In addition, tablets and/or insulin can be required. 

 

 

Sally Taylor-Goodwin
Communications Manager - Wales